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events [2017/01/20 14:38]
lsilver created page, added colleen's talk
events [2018/01/17 13:05] (current)
caljohnson
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 +
 +====Winter 2018====
 +
 +
 +**Monday, Feb. 5, Leading and Breaking Barriers Seminar:**
 +
 +Prof. Talithia Williams will be giving a talk associated with the Leading and Breaking Barriers seminar. More information to come, or check out the seminar website. https://​urc.ucdavis.edu/​events/​barriers.html
 +
 +**Friday, January 26 at 4 PM - 8 PM, GOALS X Dunloe Brewing Fundraiser:​**
 +
 +Dunloe brewing is hosting a fundraiser for girls in science and nature. While this isn't affiliated with AWM, it is a great way to support gender diversity in STEM! Check out the event here.  https://​www.facebook.com/​events/​109393343165237/​
 +
 +
 +** Thursday, Jan 25 at 4:30-6 PM, Mentorship Game Night:
 +**
 +
 +AWM will be hosting a game night to kick off the mentorship program. ​ AWM will supply food and some games. ​ Please feel free to bring your own games as well.
 +
 +
 +
 +**Wednesday,​ Jan. 17, First meeting:**
 +
 +We'll be discussing upcoming outreach events at local schools, and brainstorming how to make the most effective events for students. ​
 +
 +
 +----
 +====Fall 2017====
 +
 +** Monday, November 27, Workshop:
 +**
 +
 +Conflict Resolution - Led by Emily Meyer and Sam Fleischer
 +
 +Do you sometimes find yourself in situations where you don't know what to say?  Perhaps a coworker or friend has made an inappropriate or offensive remark and you're not sure how to make your voice heard. ​ At our last workshop (Introduction to Allyship), we began a discussion on *when* you should speak up.  At this workshop, we will address *how* you can speak up.
 +
 +We invite you to come learn with us at the Conflict Resolution workshop on November 27, at 1:10pm in MSB 3106.
 +
 +During the hour-long workshop we will introduce a specific conflict resolution technique, and participants will practice what they learn in various scenarios.
 +
 +** Tuesday, October 24, Outreach Event:
 +**
 +
 +We visited Lee Middle School in Woodland, and taught a small group of girls about math. It was fun and inspiring! In future quarters, we'll be visiting other local middle and high schools as well as Girl Scout troop meetings, with hopes of teaching young minds about math, and encouraging girls to continue learning about STEM fields. Contact us to get involved in upcoming visits!
 +
 +
 +** Monday, October 23, Workshop:
 +**
 +
 +Allyship - Led by Emily Meyer and Sam Fleischer
 +
 +Are you aware of social justice issues around you but unsure of what to do about them?  Do you want to help but don't know how?  Perhaps you've heard people make racist, sexist, xenophobic, or otherwise inappropriate jokes or statements and wondered what to say.  If any of this applies to you, then we invite you to come learn with us at the Allyship workshop on October 23 at 1:10pm in MSB 3106.
 +
 +It is important that people with privilege step up to be active allies to minority and marginalized communities. ​ This workshop will focus on when, why, and how to be an ally. 
 +
 +----
 +
 +====Spring 2017====
 +
 +** Wednesday, May 31, invited talk:
 +**
 +
 +Alyssa Gottshall from the National Security Agency will give a talk on Wednesday, May 31 from 11:​00-11:​50am in MSB 2112.  See her abstract below.
 +
 +"The Secret Lives of Mathematicians"​
 +
 +Mathematics can be more than just a subject in school, it
 +can be a career. The government is the number one single employer of
 +mathematicians in the country. Many of those mathematicians end up at
 +the National Security Agency, where they find job careers in research,
 +information assurance, and cryptanalysis. This talk will be an introduction
 +to the roles of mathematicians at NSA, as well as basics of cryptography.
 +
 +** Friday, May 19, invited talk:
 +** 
 +
 +Dr. Habib Najm from Sandia National Lab will give a research talk on Friday, May 19th, from 4:10-5:00pm in MSB 2112.  See abstract below. ​
 +
 +"​Uncertainty Quantification in Computational Modeling of Physical Systems"​
 +
 +Models of physical systems typically involve inputs/​parameters that are determined from empirical measurements,​ and therefore exhibit a certain degree of uncertainty. Estimating these uncertainties,​ and their propagation to computational model output predictions,​ is crucial for attaining truly predictive computations,​ and for purposes of model validation, design optimization,​ and decision support. ​ Recent years have seen significant developments in probabilistic methods for efficient uncertainty quantification (UQ) in computational models. ​ These include advances in inverse UQ methods, relying on Bayesian inference methods for estimation of model inputs/​parameter given data on model observables,​ and forward UQ methods, relying on functional representations of random variables and fields. ​ In this talk, I will give an introduction to the current landscape of UQ for computational models. ​ I will cover both inverse and forward UQ methods, highlighting both data and computational challenges, and illustrating specific demonstrations in select computational models.
 +
 +
 +
 +----
 +
  
 ====Winter 2017==== ====Winter 2017====
  
-**Friday January 27special invited talk:+**WednesdayMarch 15, ice cream social:
 ** **
  
-Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Personnel Dr. **Colleen Clancy** from the Pharmacology department ​on FridayJanuary 27th at **12:10pm in MSB 2112**.+The AWM chapter is hosting a social event on WednesdayMarch 15 at 7:30 pm in MSB 1147 and we hope you will all be able to attend! ​ There will be ice cream and desserts and we hope you will bring any board/card games you think would be fun for the evening This is a great opportunity for mentee/​mentor groups to meet up again, so feel free to invite your group to the event! ​ The event is open to anyone - invite your friends!
  
-**Math instead of mice: Computational approaches to reveal mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias** 
  
-The first 25 minutes will be a research talkand the second 25 minutes will be a discussion of her career path. +**FridayMarch 10, invited talk: 
 +**
  
 +Associate Professor Dr. **Miriam Nuño** from the Departments of Biostatistics and Public Health Sciences. Dr. Nuño will give a research talk as well as speak about her experiences in these fields. Friday 3/10 at **12:10pm in MSB 1147** (the large lecture hall on the ground level). See abstract below.
 +
 +
 +"Math, Statistics, and My Personal Experiences"​
 +
 +Miriam Nuño is an Associate Professor in Biostatistics and Associate Professor In Residence in the School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences. Her research focuses on surgical outcomes, methodological development of metrics aimed to improve patient outcomes and comparative effectiveness studies. Dr. Nuño completed her Ph.D. at Cornell University, postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard School of Public Health and University of California Los Angeles prior to co-directing the Center of Neurosurgical Outcomes Research at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Nuño has more than 60 publications in peer-reviewed journals, in addition to chapters in major textbooks. Recent studies include the identification of factors associated with response to inpatient rehabilitation treatment among traumatic brain injury patients and the overtreatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in surgical ICU patients.
 +
 +**Friday January 27, invited talk:
 ** **
-Abstract:** Common paroxysmal electrical diseases that affect millions of people worldwide are notoriously difficult to manage with drug therapy, and some drugs intended for therapy can even exacerbate disease. A vital hindrance to safe and effective drug treatment of excitable disorders is that there is currently no way to predict how drugs with complex interactions and multiple subcellular targets will alter the emergent electrical activity of cells and tissues. Our work involves the development of a novel quantitative systems pharmacology approach derived from a combination of experiments,​ computational biology, high performance computing and clinical observation that allows for probing the mechanisms of action of drugs in the settings of one of the most common excitable diseases: cardiac arrhythmias. These new tools can be applied to preclinical screening of compounds for therapeutic benefit or harm. A computer-based approach can be used to determine mechanisms of drugs, with a specific focus to conduct failure analysis for once promising drugs that have failed clinically. Finally, models will be applied to demonstrate utility in guiding therapy for specific clinical situations and to identify optimal “polypharmacy” to inform the common practice of clinical empirical mixing and matching of drugs to create multidrug therapeutic regimens. The computational processes that we have developed are paradigms for how the explosion in systems and computational biology can be utilized to assist drug-screening,​ determination of mechanisms and to guide therapy. The eventual goal is a scalable, automated platform that will interact with other cutting edge technologies to serve purposes in industry, academia and in clinical medicine that will be widely expanded to pharmacology of other common disorders of excitability such as epilepsy, ataxia and even pain. 
  
 +Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Personnel Dr. **Colleen Clancy** from the Pharmacology department on Friday, January 27th at **12:10pm in MSB 2112**. "Math instead of mice: Computational approaches to reveal mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias."​
 +
 +//This talk has been postponed. New date TBA, stay tuned.//
events.1484951930.txt.gz · Last modified: 2017/01/20 14:38 by lsilver